Liu Xiaobo is a Chinese literary critic, writer, professor, and human rights activist who called for political reforms and human rights in China.  He is currently incarcerated in Jinzhou, Liaoning. From 2003 to 2007 he served as President of the Independent Chinese PEN Center.   He was also the President of MinZhuZhongGuo (Democratic China) magazine since the mid-1990s. On 8 December 2008, Liu was detained because of his role in drafting the Charter 08 manifesto. He was formally arrested on 23 June 2009 on suspicion of "inciting subversion of state power." On 23 December 2009 he was tried on these charges, and sentenced to eleven years' imprisonment and two years' deprivation of political rights on 25 December 2009. During his prison term, he was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize for "his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China." He is the first Chinese citizen to be awarded a Nobel Prize of any kind while residing in China.

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My love for you, on the other hand, is so full of remorse and regret that it at times makes me stagger under its weight. I am an insensate stone in the wilderness, whipped by fierce wind and torrential rain, so cold that no one dares touch me. But my love is solid and sharp, capable of piercing through any obstacle. Even if I were crushed into powder, I would still use my ashes to embrace you.

Given your love, my sweetheart, I would face my forthcoming trial calmly, with no regrets about my choice and looking forward to tomorrow optimistically. I look forward to my country being a land of free expression, where all citizens' speeches are treated the same; where different values, ideas, beliefs, political views ... both compete with each other and coexist peacefully; where, majority and minority opinions will be given equal guarantees, in particular, views different from those in power will be fully respected and protected; where all views will be spread in the sunlight for the people to choose; where all citizens will be able to express their political views without fear, and will never be politically persecuted for voicing dissent.
 
I hope to be the last victim of China's endless literary inquesition, and that after this no one else will ever be jailed for their speech.